In Part 1 of this series on branding, we discussed defining your brand, creating your logo, and putting that logo on everything. Here, in Part 2, we’ll cover brand messaging, integrating your brand, and marketing your brand.

Brand Messaging

According to Pardot, brand messaging refers to the underlying value proposition conveyed and language used in your content. It’s what makes buyers relate to your brand by inspiring them, persuading them, motivating them, and ultimately making them want to buy your product. To determine what your current brand message is, look at your business from three perspectives:

  • The customer – Find out what matters to them. Don’t presume anything based on what you think it is, or should be. That defeats the purpose. Interview customers, survey them, pay attention to them on social media. Identify what they value most in terms of your industry and offering, and pay attention to key ideas you hear repeatedly from them.
  • The company – Find out what about your product or service makes it unique. Ask people inside your organization what they think is unique about your product, the manufacturing process, the sales process, etc. What is the existing company culture, and does it reflect positively? If not, you’ll need to change it, but that’s another subject.
  • The marketplace – Find out how your competitors position themselves in the marketplace. Look at their tag lines. Read the “about us” page on their website. Follow them on social media. You want to make sure your own position in the marketplace is distinct.

Once you’ve looked at your business from these three perspectives, make any adjustments you deem necessary. Then write down the key messages you wish to communicate about your brand, create a “voice” for your company that reflects the brand image you wish to convey, and apply that voice to all written communication and incorporate it into all visual imagery you use. For example, if your brand is friendly, be informal and conversational. If your brand is more hi-brow, be more formal, etc.

Integrating Your Brand

Now that you’ve developed your brand message, make sure it permeates every aspect of your business from the way employees answer the phones, to how your salespeople dress, to everything you do online. In short, make your brand part of the company culture.

Marketing Your Brand

When it comes to marketing your brand, consistency is key. Just as it’s important that your brand message become part of the company culture, it must also be the foundation of all your marketing materials. This doesn’t just include static materials like sales letters and brochures; it also includes blog posts, web articles, social media content, etc.

In Conclusion

Remember, branding is what separates you from your competitors and helps consumers remember you and your products. Of course, we’ve only scratched the surface on the subject. There is much more you can learn. We encourage you to explore additional sources of information on branding. Meanwhile, we invite you to contact us online for help with your digital design and development needs.

$zopim( function() { })